Williams’ “heroic bass-baritone”

Posted on Sep 10, 2017 in Douglas Williams, Reviews | No Comments
Williams’ “heroic bass-baritone”

“Williams displayed a heroic bass-baritone and brought an imposing presence to his selections. He put across a powerfully dramatic account of Schumann’s “Belsazar,” winnowing down to a strikingly hushed coda. He also lightened his voice and style artfully in two comic, wryly witty excerpts from Heggie’s Songs of the Moon, set to Vachel Lindsay texts.” […]

Douglas Williams “walked away with the evening’s vocal honors”

Posted on Mar 17, 2017 in Douglas Williams, Reviews | No Comments
Douglas Williams “walked away with the evening’s vocal honors”

“…Douglas Williams, who sang both the Ferryman in Curlew River and Aeneas, seemed to have the measure of the room; he walked away with the evening’s vocal honors.” — Read more at zealnyc.

Cummings and Williams in National Symphony’s ‘Messiah’

Cummings and Williams in National Symphony’s ‘Messiah’

“Rapid passagework in Baroque music can sound finicky, with a kind of sewing-machine needling; but time and again, Cummings encouraged playing and singing that were smooth, gentle, even tender — from the chorus in “He shall purify,” with its rapidly ornamented, high-flying lines, or from the strings in the recitative “There were shepherds.” …”James Kryshak, […]

Williams’ “irrepressibly charming Figaro” with Milwaukee Symphony

Posted on Sep 19, 2016 in Douglas Williams, Reviews | No Comments
Williams’ “irrepressibly charming Figaro” with Milwaukee Symphony

“Bass-baritone Douglas Williams’ beautifully sung, irrepressibly charming Figaro was perfectly matched by soprano Joelle Harvey’s feisty, smart, strong-willed take on Susanna…” — Read more at jsonline.com.

“Spring’s bounty blooms at Tanglewood’s Ozawa Hall”

“Spring’s bounty blooms at Tanglewood’s Ozawa Hall”

“Mezzo-soprano Diane Moore portrayed Spring as a kind of earth mother, rich in tones and bossy over the others…baritone Douglas Williams wore a pompous air…As in their previous Tanglewood appearances, McGegan had his period-instrument orchestra playing with impressive unanimity and spirit.” – Read more at berkshireeagle.com.

Williams’ “frightening and authoritative Kyoto”

Posted on Jul 24, 2016 in Douglas Williams, Reviews | No Comments
Williams’ “frightening and authoritative Kyoto”

“Douglas Williams as the brothel owner who abducts Iris was a frightening and authoritative Kyoto, wielding an attractive baritone and crisp attacks on Luigi Illica’s incredibly texty libretto.” — Read more at Opera Teen.

La Gloria di Primavera: Gramophone Magazine Editor’s Choice

La Gloria di Primavera: Gramophone Magazine Editor’s Choice

“The Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra’s string-playing is routinely urbane, and the continuo group’s realisa-tions are impeccably shaded…Diana Moore is expressive with words and musical details in Spring’s splendid arias…part 2 has a theatrical impact thanks to Douglas Williams’s resonance and mastery across a wide-ranging tessitura. This is a delightfully enjoyable revelation of the elder Scarlatti’s genius.” […]

“Scarlatti’s ‘La Gloria’ arrives in So Cal” with McGegan, Moore, and Williams

“Scarlatti’s ‘La Gloria’ arrives in So Cal” with McGegan, Moore, and Williams

“Mezzo-soprano Diana Moore made a gracious Spring, her vibrato taut and phrasing lithe…Bass-baritone Douglas Williams provided a comically pompous and jaunty Jove. Meanwhile, McGegan and the Philharmonia Baroque supported in glowing hues and lyrical lines, the rhythm driven from the bottom of the orchestra (as in a good jazz band) and the violins gamboling ebulliently.” […]

Review: Philharmonia Baroque Unearths a 300-Year-Old Rarity

Review: Philharmonia Baroque Unearths a 300-Year-Old Rarity

“The Zankel performance featured the same fine vocal soloists heard on the recording: Diana Moore as Spring, Suzana Ograjensek as Summer, Clint van der Linde as Autumn, Nicholas Phan as Winter and Douglas Williams as Jove.” – Read more at nytimes.com.

Douglas Williams’ “inspired performance” with Master Chorale

Posted on Apr 30, 2016 in Douglas Williams, Reviews | No Comments
Douglas Williams’ “inspired performance” with Master Chorale

“The bass-baritone Douglas Williams gave an inspired performance of his long solo in the Qui tollis. He sang long, smooth, legato phrases, with a touch of graininess at the bottom that enhanced the power of his performance.” – Read more at South Florida Classical Review